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Illinois Reducing Interest Rate, Revival Deadline on Consumer Debt JudgmentsIllinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker is expected to sign a bill that will change the rules for collecting consumer debt after a debt judgment. The bill, which has passed both the Illinois Senate and House of Representatives, would reduce the interest rate charged to outstanding consumer debts. More significantly, the bill would cut by 10 years the amount of time that a creditor has to revive a judgment that has become dormant. Sponsors of the law tout it as a way to protect low-income Illinois consumers from cumbersome debts. Creditors of Illinois debtors may need to work faster to collect on court-ordered debt judgments.

Qualifications

There are two important caveats of the law as it applies to debtors. The changes affect debt judgments only if:

  • They involve consumer debts; and
  • The debt is $25,000 or less.

Consumer debts are debts accrued by individuals for personal, family, and household expenses. Nonconsumer debts are debts from an organization or business or debts that an individual accrues for purposes other than their personal expenses.

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Illinois Considers Raising Homestead Exemption to $150KIllinois lawmakers have once again introduced legislation that would change creditor’s debt collection practices. A similar bill from last year failed to make it out of committee, but lawmakers have outlined several goals that they believe will protect debtors:

  • Requiring all court summons for a debt collection lawsuit to include a debtor’s “bill of rights”;
  • Reducing the time in which a creditor can revive a judgment against a debtor to five years;
  • Lowering the annual interest rate on debt judgments less than $25,000 to two percent; and
  • Raising the value of the exemptions that debtors can use to protect their assets from creditors.

The proposed change to the homestead exemption stands out because of the sizeable jump. The exemption would increase from $15,000 to $150,000 for an individual homeowner and $30,000 to $200,000 for a couple.

Homestead Exemption

A home is often the most valuable property that a person owns, which makes it important to debtors and creditors. Creditors could recover a large portion of the debt by forcing the debtor to sell the property, but the debtor wants to protect the equity he or she has in the property. Illinois’ homestead exemption allows a debtor to prevent creditors from selling a property as long as the debtor’s equity interest is below $15,000. The equity interest is calculated by subtracting what the debtor owes on the mortgage from the value of the property. Raising the homestead exemption would make it more difficult for creditors to sell a debtor’s home after a judgment lien.

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Illinois Enacting New Rules for Credit Card Companies, Debt BuyersThe Illinois Supreme Court has adopted new rules regarding procedures for credit card companies and debt buyers who file lawsuits against debtors. The rules will go into effect on Oct. 1 and will apply to both new cases and active cases that have not reached a judgment. The new rules do not apply to an original creditor that is not a credit card company. The rules create new requirements that are meant to force creditors to be more timely and thorough in filing specified motions in court. There are three notable rule changes:

  1. New Affidavit Requirements: A credit card company or debt buyer must use a new affidavit form when filing a complaint against a debtor. A statement must accompany the affidavit that says that the complaint was filed within the statute of limitations. Applicable creditors can modify their existing affidavit to comply with the new rule, as long as it includes the debt contract, relevant information on both parties, and a history of the debt.
  2. Same-Day Motions: Credit card companies and debt buyers will need to give prior notice before requesting a continuance or voluntary dismissal of a trial. This means that the court will no longer accept a plaintiff’s written or oral request to end or continue a trial if it is made on the day of the trial. Courts may require that applicable creditors file a motion to dismiss a trial at least five business days before the trial. As for a continuance, the court may accept a same-day request if both parties agree to it and the continuance would serve the interest of justice.
  3. Identity Theft Rules: A defendant may claim that he or she is not liable for a debt because he or she was the victim of identity theft. A new rule requires a debtor to file an identity theft affidavit. Once the affidavit is filed, the creditor will have 90 days to either dismiss the lawsuit or contest the affidavit. To contest the identity theft claim, the creditor must submit its own affidavit that gives factual evidence as to why the identity theft claim is false.

Effect on Creditors

The new rules largely favor debtors because they require creditors to make quicker decisions on how to proceed during their cases. Failing to comply with the rules could delay a judgment or lead to a dismissal. A Chicago creditor’s rights attorney at Walinski & Associates, P.C., can help you remain in compliance with court rules and obtain the judgment you need in your case. Schedule a consultation by calling 312-704-0771.

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Illinois Considering Five Changes to Debt Collection LawsA group of Illinois State Representatives has introduced a package of bills that are meant to increase debtor protection against creditors. The bills are all stalled at the committee level, putting their future in doubt. However, that is unlikely to stop the legislators from continuing to push these bills or from creating similar bills in the future if the current bills die. The laws would reduce a creditor’s ability to collect on outstanding debts by shortening the window of opportunity to enforce a debt judgment, reducing interest rates on debts, and providing greater protections for debtor assets.

Proposed Changes

The legislators have presented five bills that would amend Illinois’ Code of Civil Procedure, including:

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